Eclipse chasers blaze trail to small Oregon town

Joe Krenowicz, executive director of the Madras-Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, gestures toward Mt. Jefferson as the sun rises over Madras, Oregon on June 13, 2017. The first place to experience total darkness as the moon passes between the sun and the Earth will be in Oregon and Madras, in the central part of the state, is expected to be a prime viewing location. Up to 1 million people are expected in Oregon for the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years and up to 100,000 could show up in Madras and surrounding Jefferson County. Officials are worried about the ability of the rural area to host so many visitors and are concerned about the danger of wildfire from so many people camping on public lands. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

MADRAS, Ore. — Just before sunrise, there’s typically nothing atop Round Butte but the whistle of the wind and a panoramic view of Oregon’s second-highest peak glowing pink in the faint light.

Officials meet to discuss eclipse

In this May 20, 2012, file photo, the annular solar eclipse produces flare through a lens in Alameda, Calif. Destinations are hosting festivals, hotels are selling out and travelers are planning trips for the total solar eclipse that will be visible coast to coast on Aug. 21, 2017. A narrow path of the United States 60 to 70 miles wide from Oregon to South Carolina will experience total darkness, also known as totality. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

State, regional and local officials met for a few hours Tuesday morning at the downtown fire station to discuss plans for the August eclipse, which expected to bring an unprecedented influx of tourists.

ITD prepares for eclipse weekend

The Interstate 15 corridor is expected to make eastern Idaho accesible to tens if not hundreds of thousands of eclipse-chasers from around the West. Courtesy GreatAmericanEclipse.com

The Aug. 21 solar eclipse is expected to impact eastern Idaho’s highway system more than any event in recent history.

NASA comes to Museum of Idaho

In this June 10, 2002, file photo, Lise Richardson, left, views a partial solar eclipse with her daughters Sophia Richardson, center left, and Samantha, 6, right, at Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. Destinations are hosting festivals, hotels are selling out and travelers are planning trips for the total solar eclipse that will be visible coast to coast on Aug. 21, 2017. A narrow path of the United States 60 to 70 miles wide from Oregon to South Carolina will experience total darkness, also known as totality. (AP Photo/Krista Niles, File)

The National Aeronautic and Space Administration is working with the Museum of Idaho to put on a variety of educational events ahead of the August eclipse.

Pages

Subscribe to