The Post Register has been reporting on the 1996 murder of Angie Dodge since it occurred. In 2014, coverage of the case increased as efforts to exonerate the man convicted of the murder, Chris Tapp, also increased and became more public. Tapp has spent more than 19 years incarcerated for the crime that many wrongful conviction advocates, including Judges for Justice and the Innocence Project, feel he did not commit. This page compiles all of the Post Register's coverage of the case and the efforts to exonerate Tapp dating back to 2013.


Twenty years ago the Dodge family was planning a small reunion for June 13.

Brent Dodge, the oldest brother, lived in Preston, where he worked for a large pluming supply company. He had a meeting to discuss a sale to the Madison School District, so it was a good time for the family to reunite over lunch at his grandmother’s house in Idaho Falls.

Brent had his 4-year-old daughter Heidi come with him on the trip, so she could see the rest of the family.

Around 70 people packed a small theater in the Artitorium on Broadway on Tuesday night to watch a presentation suggesting that Chris Tapp was wrongfully convicted of the 1996 murder of Angie Dodge, and to discuss how to apply pressure to free Tapp.

Public defender John Thomas has filed another petition to fight the conviction of Chris Tapp.

Tapp has served nearly half his life in jail or prison after being convicted of the 1996 rape and murder of 18-year-old Angie Dodge. Tapp was convicted because he confessed.

KUNA — Today marks the 19th anniversary of Chris Tapp’s time behind bars — 6,940 days.

During that time Tapp’s father died. He couldn’t go to the funeral.

And, three weeks ago, Lori Hollandsworth — a Tennessee woman who advocated for his release and married him in a short 2013 prison ceremony — died in a car accident.

“She was my voice,” Tapp said, wiping away tears.

Two days after a crowd of around 100 gathered at the Shilo Inn to talk about organizing to advocate for the release of Chris Tapp, the Idaho Falls Police Department has issued a statement seeking to assure the public that it is continuing its investigation into the murder of Angie Dodge.

Dodge was sexually assaulted and murdered in her apartment in the letter streets neighborhood in 1996.

Tapp was convicted of Dodge’s murder in 1998 after he confessed to the crime. But many now claim that the confession was coerced by police, and that Tapp was not involved in the murder.

Public outcry for the release of Chris Tapp is growing.

A crowd gathered at the Shilo Inn on Wednesday night to watch a presentation that argued Tapp, who has spent 19 years in prison for the murder of Angie Dodge, was wrongfully convicted.

Dodge was sexually assaulted and murdered in her apartment in the letter streets neighborhood in 1996. The murder shocked the conscience of a town not used to such brutal crimes.

Judges for Justice, a nonprofit organization that seeks to have the wrongfully convicted released, will hold an open house tonight to provide more information to the public on the conviction of Chris Tapp.

The open house will be held at 6 p.m. at the Shilo Inn, 780 Lindsay Blvd., according to a news release.

Tapp was convicted of the 1996 murder of Angie Dodge and has

Bonneville County Prosecutor Danny Clark has named a former detective to re-investigate the 1998 murder conviction of Chris Tapp.

Stuart Robinson is currently a private investigator based in Twin Falls. He formerly served as an officer with the Burley

Police Department and a detective with the Blackfoot Police Department. He spent 19 years as an investigator with the Bureau of Criminal Investigation at the Idaho Department of Law Enforcement — the precursor to the Idaho State Police.

The Bonneville County Commission approved funding for the investigator Oct. 22.

When Bonneville County Prosecutor Danny Clark selects the expert charged with reviewing the 1998 murder conviction of Chris Tapp, he’ll have a thick stack of paper to wade through.

Yet another report has been released calling into question the Idaho Falls Police Department’s investigation into the 1996 murder of 18-year-old Angie Dodge.

Judges for Justice has presented more evidence that Chris Tapp, imprisoned for the 1996 murder of Angie Dodge, is not the killer.

It’s the latest of a slew of recent reports from national experts suggesting that Tapp, who has spent 6,716 days in jail and prison, falsely confessed to the crime.

Bonneville County Prosecutor Danny

Clark said Wednesday that he expects to hire an outside expert to review the case within a week or two.

A man briefly eyed as a possible suspect in the 1996 killing of 18-year-old Angie Dodge was in Idaho Falls last week to make a documentary about the case.

Michael Usry, a 36-year-old New Orleans filmmaker, was questioned and ordered to submit a DNA sample in December after police partially matched DNA samples left at the crime scene to the DNA of his father.

Usry’s father, Michael Usry Sr., along with several other ward members in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, donated DNA samples to a database meant to aid in compiling family genealogies.

District Judge Joel Tingey has disqualified himself from presiding over Chris Tapp’s latest challenge to his 1998 murder conviction.

Tapp is serving a prison sentence of 30 years to life for the 1996 murder of 18-year old Angie Dodge in Idaho Falls. He has filed several appeals and motions for post-conviction relief since the jury found him guilty, all of which have failed.

Tapp filed his latest such petition May 1. It seeks to have numerous previously untested items from the crime scene submitted for DNA testing.

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