Thrill-ride accidents spark demands for regulation

In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 file photo, amusement device inspector Avery Wheelock inspects the safety pins on a children's merry-go-round at the Mississippi State Fair in Jackson, Miss. In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

Finding your center in Idaho’s granite heart

Elizabeth Price operates Yoga in Body Retreats from the Ram House Lodge above Mackay Bar on the Salmon River. She partnered with some other guides and jet boat/outfitter service Mountain River Outfitters to purchase the house above Mackay Bar where customers come for yoga retreats, massage, fishing and stand-up paddle board lessons. Submitted photo

MACKAY BAR — From her “million-dollar deck,” Elizabeth Price surveyed the Salmon River gurgling below the sparse pines, bushes and forbs on the canyon walls. Looking west, the South Fork sparkled from the bottom of its equally magnificent gorge.

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