Job market’s new normal: Smaller workforce, sluggish pay

In this June 19, 2015 photo, Mark Flannigan makes a batch of popcorn at the Popcorn Wagon in Pittsfield, Mass. The Popcorn Wagon, owned by Berkshire Bank and operated by Goodwill's Business 101 program, is used to teach participants the ins-and-outs of business enterprises. Even with steady hiring and a falling unemployment rate, the U.S. job market is not what it used to be. (Ben Garver/The Berkshire Eagle via AP)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Even after another month of strong hiring in June and a sinking unemployment rate, the U.S. job market just isn’t what it used to be.

US airline probe would need proof beyond business as usual

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2013 file photo, Travelers pass through a corridor at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia. The U.S. government is investigating possible collusion between major airlines to limit available seats, which keeps airfares high, according to a document obtained by The Associated Press. The civil antitrust investigation by the Justice Department appears to focus on whether airlines illegally signaled to each other how quickly they would add new flights, routes and extra seats.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the Justice Department launches an investigation into possible collusion in the airline industry, experts say the government faces the burden of proving that carriers were deliberately signaling business decisions to each other.

World stocks drift lower ahead of Greek vote; China plunges

FILE - This Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, file photo, shows the facade of the New York Stock Exchange. European stocks were little changed and Treasury prices rose Thursday, July 2, 2015, following a solid U.S. jobs report for June. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

HONG KONG (AP) — World stock markets mostly drifted lower Friday ahead of Greece’s weekend austerity referendum, while China’s main stock benchmark plunged as much as 7 percent as government market stabilization measures failed to reassure panicky investors.

Wine ice cream, maple water: 5 foods of the future?

This undated product image provided by Mercer's shows the upsate New York dairy's Port wine ice cream. The ice creams come in eight flavors including Strawberry Sparkling, Cherry Merlot and Chocolate Cabernet. (Mercer's via AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — Chips made out of broccoli, chickpeas and kale. Wine-spiked ice cream. Popcorn that didn’t quite fulfill its destiny.

BP to pay record $18.7 billion to states affected by spill

FILE- In this June 4, 2010 file photo, a worker picks up blobs of oil with absorbent snare on Queen Bess Island at the mouth of Barataria Bay near the Gulf of Mexico in Plaquemines Parish, La. BP and five Gulf states announced a record $18.7 billion settlement Thursday, July 2, 2015, that resolves years of legal fighting over the environmental and economic damage done by the energy giants oil spill in 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — More than five years after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history fouled beaches, coated seabirds in thick goo and threatened delicate marshes, BP has agreed to pay a record settlement to affected states in hopes of bringing an end to a legal drama that has cost the company billions.

Military recruits still not using American-made sneakers

In this photo taken Wednesday, July 1, 2015, the New Balance proposed 950v2 sneaker, that has passed military testing, is displayed at one of company's manufacturing facilities in Boston. New Balance is pressing the Pentagon to buy American-made footwear for the troops instead of sneakers from rival Nike that are made in China. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

BOSTON (AP) — New Balance thinks the U.S. military is dragging its feet.

US stocks open higher following mostly positive job report

FILE - This Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, file photo, shows the facade of the New York Stock Exchange. European stocks were little changed and Treasury prices rose Thursday, July 2, 2015, following a solid U.S. jobs report for June. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are opening slightly higher as investors look over a mostly positive report on the job market.

US employers add 223K jobs; jobless rate falls to 5.3 pct.

In this photo taken Tuesday, June 30, 2015, Sophia Lewis, left, with PSEG Long Island, speaks to an attendee about employment opportunities during a job fair at Citi Field in New York. U.S. employers likely hired at another strong pace in June, a sign that the job market is nearing full health and giving the Federal Reserve reason to raise interest rates as early as September. Economists predict that employers added 233,000 jobs and that the unemployment rate dipped to 5.4 percent from 5.5 percent in May, according to data firm FactSet. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a solid 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent, a seven-year low. But wages failed to budge, and other barometers of the job market paint a mixed picture.

What crisis? Stronger banks, economies ease fear over Greece

FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2015, file photo, a Greek flag flies outside the Athens Stock Exchange. In 2012, financial markets were rattled by the possibility Greece would elect a left-wing government, default on their debts and drop the euro currency. In 2015, the left-wing party, Syriza, holds power in Athens. Greece actually did miss a loan payment to the International Monetary Fund late Tuesday, June 30, 2015. And the nation's future in the eurozone hinges precariously on a referendum Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris, File)

The prospect of a Greek crackup isn’t so terrifying anymore.

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