Programs run into pitfalls with fining players

A television monitor outside the Virginia Tech football players' lounge shows an apparent fine structure for improper equipment, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015, in Blacksburg, Va. Virginia Tech defensive coordinator Bud Foster's Wednesday night interview took place just feet from this monitor. Virginia Tech athletic director Whit Babcock quickly responded to Foster's suggestion that coaches might fine players from their cost of attendance stipends by saying no such thing will happen. New NCAA rules allow schools to pay a stipend of several thousand dollars to athletes that cover school expenses beyond tuition, fees and room and board. Virginia Tech is among the many schools paying the stipend. (Mike Barber/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)

(AP) - Take away game tickets for missing class. Hold back a bowl gift for being late. Maybe even dock a player his $15 per diem for skipping study hall.

North Dakota State to provide athlete stipends

FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2015 file photo, members of the North Dakota State football team hold the championship trophy after their 29-27 win over Illinois State in the FCS Championship NCAA college football game in Frisco, Texas. NDSU says it will start providing stipends to scholarship athletes in all 16 sports beginning next year with a goal of paying the full cost of attending college. Officials with the school that has won four straight Football Championship Subdivision titles say the anticipated additional cost will be up to $3,400 per full scholarship. (AP Photo/Tim Sharp, File)

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — Football Championship Subdivision powerhouse North Dakota State said Thursday it will provide thousands of dollars in stipends to scholarship athletes in all 16 sports beginning next year, a move that could persuade other mid-majors to follow suit.

More NCAA athletes seek own trademarks

In this Aug. 16, 2015 photo, Ohio State running back Ezekiel Elliott speaks to reporters during the university's NCAA college football media day in Columbus, Ohio. More college football stars are starting to snatch up trademark rights to their names, nicknames and fan slogans. This month Elliott applied for trademarks to use his nicknames Zeke and Eze on merchandise, according to records in a public database kept by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. (AP Photo/Paul Vernon)

BOSTON (AP) — Like their counterparts in the pros, more college football stars are starting to snatch up trademark rights to their names, nicknames and fan slogans.

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