Jury still out on extent of crop damage

Bill Bradshaw / freditor@postregister.com
A gray cast indicating the presence of a fungus and possibly sprout damage is replacing the usual golden color in this still-unharvested barley Tuesday along 2300 East in Jefferson County, according to Bonneville County Extension Agent Wayne Jones. The fungus and sprout damage are the result of the August rains that prevented a timely harvest causing widespread damage to grain crops in eastern Idaho.

Last month’s rain damage to Idaho’s wheat, barley and alfalfa crops are being quantified as harvest winds down.

Tobacco farmers brace for tougher competition

In this Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, photo, farm workers, from left, Carlos Sanchez, Francisco Zuniga, and Alejandro Zuniga, pick tobacco leaves on Chris Haskins' farm near Chatham, Va. Starting next month, Americas remaining tobacco growers will be totally exposed to the laws of supply and demand. The very last buyout checks go out in October to about 425,000 tobacco farmers and landowners. Theyre the last holdovers from a price-support and quota system that had guaranteed minimum prices for most of the 20th century, sustaining a way of life that began 400 years ago in Virginia. (AP Photo/Johnny Clark)

DANVILLE, Va. (AP) — Starting next month, America’s remaining tobacco growers will be totally exposed to the laws of supply and demand.

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