McCain doesn’t back GOP health care bill

FILE - In this July 27, 2017, file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. McCain says he won't vote for the Republican bill repealing the Obama health care law. His statement likely deals a fatal blow to the last-gasp GOP measure in a Senate showdown expected next week. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, file)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. John McCain declared his opposition Friday to the GOP’s last-ditch effort to repeal and replace “Obamacare,” dealing a likely death blow to the legislation and, perhaps, to the Republican Party’s years of vows to kill the program. It was the second time in three months the 81-year-old McCain emerged as the destroyer of his party’s signature promise to voters.

Forest Service, Idaho work to boost logging on federal land

FILE - In this Aug. 21, 2016, file photo, a plane drops a load of fire retardant on the north side of Beacon Hill, in Spokane, Wash. The U.S. Forest Service and Idaho have forged agreements leading to more logging on federal land in what officials say could become a template for other Western states and reduce the severity of wildfires. (Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review, via AP, File)

BOISE — The U.S. Forest Service and Idaho have forged 10 agreements for logging and restoration projects on federal land in what officials say could become a template for other Western states to create jobs and reduce the severity of wildfires.

Dam failing, scope of Puerto Rico’s disaster rises

Residents evacuate after the passing of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, Friday, September 22, 2017. Because of the heavy rains brought by Maria, thousands of people were evacuated from Toa Baja after the municipal government opened the gates of the Rio La Plata Dam. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rican officials rushed to evacuate tens of thousands of people downstream of a failing dam and said they could not reach more than half the towns in the U.S. territory as the massive scale of the disaster wrought by Hurricane Maria started to become clear on Friday.

Disability advocates ‘terrified’ of health bill

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., center, speaks, accompanied by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Senate Republicans are sprinting to pass a health care bill in a last-ditch effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act without the need for any bipartisan support. It has Idaho disability advocates warning of a catastrophe.

After Equifax, shaming but GOP wary of new rules

FILE - This July 21, 2012, file photo shows Equifax Inc., offices in Atlanta. Prospects are good for a public shaming, but it’s unlikely Congress will institute sweeping new regulations after hackers accessed the personal information of an estimated 143 million Americans in the Equifax data breach. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prospects are good for a public shaming in the Equifax data breach, but it’s unlikely Congress will institute sweeping new regulations after hackers accessed the personal information of an estimated 143 million Americans.

Kimmel’s take on health care hard to refute

FILE - In this March 8, 2015, file photo, Jimmy Kimmel arrives at the 32nd Annual Paleyfest : "Scandal" held at The Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Kimmel said on Sept. 19, 2017, that Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy “lied right to my face” by going back on his word to ensure any health care overhaul passes a test the Republican lawmaker named for the late night host. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Who’s right — President Donald Trump and Sen. Bill Cassidy, or late-night host Jimmy Kimmel?

Kim Jong Un: ‘Deranged’ Trump will ‘pay dearly’

In this Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, photo distributed on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un delivers a statement in response to U.S. President Donald Trump's speech to the United Nations, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Kim, in an extraordinary and direct rebuke, called Trump "deranged" and said he will "pay dearly" for his threats, a possible indication of more powerful weapons tests on the horizon. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, in an extraordinary and direct rebuke, called President Donald Trump “deranged” and said he will “pay dearly” for his threats, a possible indication of more powerful weapons tests on the horizon.

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