Senators override Obama’s veto of Sept. 11 bill

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2016, file photo, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks with the media on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate is poised to reject President Barack Obama’s veto of a bill that would allow the families of Sept. 11 victims to sue the government of Saudi Arabia even as lawmakers express fears the legislation could backfire on the United States. “I will bet that Obama’s veto will not be sustained,” said Reid. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

WASHINGTON — The Senate acted decisively Wednesday to override President Barack Obama’s veto of Sept. 11 legislation, setting the stage for the contentious bill to become law despite flaws that Obama and top Pentagon officials warn could put U.S. troops and interests at risk.

Deal reached to keep US government running

FILE - In tis June 21, 2016, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., accompanied by, from left, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, listen to a question during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats opened a last-minute push Tuesday, Sept. 27, for new talks on must-do legislation to prevent the government from shutting down this weekend, fight the Zika virus and help flood-ravaged Louisiana rebuild. The aim is to see if Republicans will relent and add money to help Flint, Mich., with its water crisis — and get Capitol Hill off a collision course that could lead to a government shutdown this weekend. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders have broken a stalemate over money to address the Flint, Michigan, water crisis, clearing the way Wednesday for a spending bill needed to keep the government running until December. The spending measure also would provide long-delayed money to fight the Zika virus and help Louisiana rebuild from last month’s disastrous floods.

Database coming on police use of deadly force

FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on 'Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.' (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

WASHINGTON — The FBI will have up and running within two years a database that tracks instances of police use of deadly force, FBI Director James Comey told members of Congress on Wednesday.

AP: Police in U.S. abuse confidential databases

In this image made from an Oct. 11, 2011 video made available by the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Florida Highway Patrol Officer Donna Watts arrests Miami Police Department Officer Fausto Lopez who was traveling at 120 miles per hour to an off-duty job, in Hollywood, Fla. After the incident, Watts says that she was harassed with prank calls, threatening posts on law enforcement message boards and unfamiliar cars that idled near her home. In lawsuits, she accused dozens of officers of obtaining information about her in the state’s driver database. (Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles via AP)

DENVER (AP) — Police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons that have nothing to do with daily police work, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Ex-Israeli president, PM Shimon Peres dies at 93

FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2007, file photo, Presidents Shimon Peres of Israel, left, Abdullah Gul of Turkey, center, and President of the Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas try to reach hands as they pose for cameras after their meeting in Ankara. Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, has died, the Israeli news website YNet reported early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. He was 93. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici, File)

JERUSALEM (AP) — Shimon Peres, a former Israeli president and prime minister, whose life story mirrored that of the Jewish state and who was celebrated around the world as a Nobel prize-winning visionary who pushed his country toward peace, died early Wednesday. He was 93.

Document: Man killed by cop had threatened wife

Law enforcement officers gather outside police headquarters in Charlotte, N.C., on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, after a suspicious package was found inside the building. A city spokesman says the structure was evacuated and searched as a precaution following days of protests over the fatal police shooting of a black man. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The black man killed by Charlotte police had a restraining order filed against him a year ago when he threatened to kill his wife and her son with a gun, according to court documents obtained Tuesday.

Typhoon hits eastern China, Taiwan, killing 5

A woman eats and struggles with her umbrella against powerful gusts of wind generated by typhoon Megi across the the island in Taipei, Taiwan, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. Schools and offices have been closed on Taiwan and people in dangerous areas have been evacuated as a large typhoon with 162 kilometers- (100 miles-) per-hour winds approaches the island. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)

BEIJING (AP) — A massive typhoon left one person dead in eastern China on Wednesday, a day after killing four and injuring 260 in Taiwan.

Ex-ally: Gov. Christie seemed happy about gridlock

David Wildstein,right, former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, arrives at the Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Courthouse with his attorney Alan Zegas, left, on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016.. Wildstein will continue to testify in the Bridgegate trial. (Amy Newman/The Record of Bergen County via AP)

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — Gov. Chris Christie was told about the epic 2013 traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge while it was underway, seemed happy about it and joked sarcastically that there was nothing political going on, a former loyalist testified Tuesday in the scandal that helped destroy Christie’s White House ambitions.

Battle for besieged Syria’s Aleppo intensifies

In this photo provided by the Syrian Civil Defense group known as the White Helmets, Syrians carry a victim after airstrikes by government helicopters on the rebel-held Aleppo neighborhood of Mashhad, Syria, Tuesday Sept. 27, 2016. With diplomacy in tatters and a month left to go before U.S. elections, the Syrian government and its Russian allies are using the time to try and recapture the northern city of Aleppo, mobilizing pro-government militias in the Old City and pressing ahead with the most destructive aerial campaign of the past five years. (Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets via AP)

BEIRUT (AP) — With international diplomacy in tatters and the U.S. focused on its election, the Syrian government and its Russian allies are seizing the moment to wage an all-out campaign to recapture Aleppo, unleashing the most destructive bombing of the past five years and pushing into the center of the Old City.

N.Y. house explosion kills fire battalion chief

In this frame from video provided by WABC-TV, smoke rises from a house that exploded in the Bronx borough of New York on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. Authorities said firefighters responded to a report of a gas leak right before the house exploded. (WABC-TV via AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — A battalion chief who had been considered a rising star in the Fire Department of New York was killed Tuesday when a row house exploded as he was supervising an evacuation following a report of a gas leak, and authorities are looking into whether the building was being used to grow marijuana.

Pages

Subscribe to