Turmoil shakes up agency in charge of US lands

FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2017 file photo, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks on the Trump Administration's energy policy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington. A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and repeated complaints that dissenting views have been sidelined. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

BILLINGS, Mont. — A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and a sweeping reorganization proposed for its 70,000 employees.

Shooting survivors on potential collision course with Trump

Samantha Ramirez, 12, holds a sign with other students and parents at an intersection near the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018, where 17 people were killed in a mass shooting on Wednesday. Nikolas Cruz, a former student, was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — Student survivors of the deadly Florida school shooting who hope to become the face of a revived gun control movement are on a potential collision course with President Donald Trump.

Cities pitching diversity in efforts to lure businesses

In this Jan. 26, 2018 photo, people skate at the Campus Martius ice rink in Detroit. Some cities and regions are dangling racial diversity along with positive business climates, competitive tax rates and available land in pitches to lure tech companies and high-paying jobs to town. Places such as Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Detroit are touting their populations of people of color to chief executives and other corporate officials as part of being open for business. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Some cities and regions are highlighting racial diversity along with positive business climates, competitive tax rates and available land in pitches to lure tech companies and high-paying jobs to town.

High court asked to iron out polling place clothing dispute

In this Feb. 16, 2018, photo, Andy Cilek poses with a Tea Party shirt at his home in Eden Prairie, Minn. Cilek was one of two voters who defied elections officials after he was asked to cover up a tea-party shirt and button. A Minnesota law that bars voters from wearing political hats, T-shirts, buttons and other apparel to the polls is about to get a look from the Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A “Make America Great Again” hat. A tea party T-shirt. A MoveOn.org button.

Olympic curling world stunned by Russian doping scandal

United States's skip John Shuster, center, slides on the ice with teammates before the start of the their men's curling match against United States at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — When word broke on Monday that a Russian Olympic curler was facing a doping charge, the curling world was floored. Not because of the tired cliche that curling isn’t a real sport (and therefore, why would a curler need to dope?) But because doping goes against the very essence of what curling is all about.

Iranian rescuers find wreckage from plane crash

In this photo provided by Tasnim News Agency, a rescue helicopter flies over the Dena mountains while searching for wreckage of a plane that crashed on Sunday, in southern Iran, Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Iranian search and rescue teams on Monday reached the site of a plane crash the previous day that authorities say killed all 65 people on board, Iran's Press TV reported.(Ali Khodaei/Tasnim News Agency via AP)

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iranian search and rescue teams on Monday reached the site of a plane crash that authorities say killed all 65 people on board, Iran’s Press TV reported.

Trump fumes about Russia investigation as nation mourns

President Donald Trump gestures as he walks as he leaves the White House, Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in Washington, for a trip to his private Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump spent the holiday weekend hunkered down at his Florida estate, watching cable television news, grousing to club members and advisers and fuming over the investigation of Russian election meddling.

Turkey warns it may hit Syrian troops in Kurdish enclave

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, and Jordanian Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi, give a press conference in Amman, Jordan, Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Cavusoglu said his country is ready to battle Syrian government troops if they enter an enclave in northern Syria to protect Syrian Kurdish fighters. Syrian state media said Sunday that pro-Syrian government forces will begin entering the Afrin enclave "within hours," after reaching an agreement with the Kurdish militia in control of the region. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

BEIRUT (AP) — Turkey threatened on Monday to hit back at Syrian pro-government troops if they deploy in an enclave in northern Syria to protect a Kurdish militia that Ankara is battling there.

Trump once again wants to cut energy assistance to the poor

FILE - In this Jan. 2, 2008, file photo, heating oil is delivered to a home in Barre, Vt. The Trump administration is once again in 2018 calling for the complete elimination of low-income heating assistance, using the same arguments from the previous year. They are citing an old report to suggest there's "sizable" fraud and saying no one will be left in the cold because utilities can't be turned off when it's cold. Once again, members of congress are vowing to fight. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The Trump administration is once again calling for the complete elimination of a heating assistance program that helps to keep the homes of low-income families warm. And once again, program supporters are vowing to fight it.

West Africa’s extremism spreading as thousands flee homes

FILE- In this Monday Jan. 18, 2016 file photo, a soldier stands guard outside the Splendid Hotel in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. West Africa's extremist threat has moved into a new part of the vast Sahel region, with a previously calm area of Burkina Faso facing the kinds of assaults that have forced thousands elsewhere to flee over the past year. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)

OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso (AP) — West Africa’s extremist threat has moved into a new part of the vast Sahel region, with a previously calm area of Burkina Faso facing the kinds of assaults that have forced thousands elsewhere to flee over the past year.

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