A better mammogram? Huge study putting 3-D scans to the test

In this Nov. 21, 2017 photo provided by the Montefiore Health System, Dr. Tova Koenigsberg at The Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care in New York shows an example of a traditional mammogram scan. U.S. health officials are beginning a huge study to compare traditional mammograms with 3-D versions, to see if the newer choice might really improve screening for breast cancer. (Montefiore Health System via AP)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A better mammogram? Increasingly women are asked if they want a 3-D mammogram instead of the regular X-ray — and now U.S. health officials are starting a huge study to tell if the newer, sometimes pricier choice really improves screening for breast cancer.

Trump’s attacks put new FBI director in tough spot

FILE - In this Oct. 22, 2017, file photo, FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks at the International Association of Chiefs of Police annual conference in Philadelphia. Wray is facing a tough test four months into his leadership of the FBI. He must defend the agency against blistering attacks from President Donald Trump without putting his own job at risk. (AP Photo/Michael Balsamo, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Christopher Wray faces a tough test four months into his leadership of the FBI: He must defend America’s top law enforcement agency against blistering attacks from President Donald Trump without putting his own job at risk.

Franken faces fresh accusations, weighing his future

In this Nov. 27, 2017 photo, Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., speaks to the media on Capitol Hill in Washington. Franken is denying an accusation by a former Democratic congressional aide that he tried to forcibly kiss her after a taping of his radio show in 2006. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Minnesota Democrat Al Franken, facing fresh allegations of sexual misconduct and vanishing support from fellow Democrats, appears to be on the brink of resigning from the Senate.

N. Korea: War is inevitable as allies continue war games

In this photo provided by South Korea Defense Ministry, U.S. Air Force B-1B bomber, right top, flies over the Korean Peninsula with South Korean fighter jets and U.S. fighter jets during the combined aerial exercise, South Korea, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. The United States flew a B-1B supersonic bomber over South Korea on Wednesday in part of a massive combined aerial exercise involving hundreds of warplanes, a clear warning after North Korea last week tested its biggest and most powerful missile yet. (South Korea Defense Ministry via AP)

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea says a nuclear war on the Korean Peninsula has become a matter of when, not if, as it continued to lash out at a massive joint military exercise between the United States and South Korea involving hundreds of advanced warplanes.

New dinosaur looks like a mix of duck, croc, ostrich, swan

This illustration provided by Lukas Panzarin, with Andrea Cau for scientific supervision, shows a Halszkaraptor escuilliei dinosaur. The creature, about 18 inches (45 centimeters) tall, had a bill like a duck but teeth like a croc's, a swan-like neck and killer claws. (Lukas Panzarin via AP)

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a bill like a duck but teeth like a croc’s, a swanlike neck and killer claws, a new dinosaur species uncovered by scientists looks like something Dr. Seuss could have dreamed up.

Mideast braces for fallout from Trump’s move on Jerusalem

A view of the Western Wall and the Dome of the Rock, some of the holiest sites for for Jews and Muslims, is seen in Jerusalem's Old City, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. U.S. officials say President Donald Trump will recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital Wednesday, Dec. 6, and instruct the State Department to begin the multi-year process of moving the American embassy from Tel Aviv to the holy city. His decision could have deep repercussions across the region. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

JERUSALEM (AP) — Palestinians shuttered schools and shops and called for protests in West Bank towns on Thursday, while the leader of the Hamas militant group called for a new armed uprising, in widespread show of anger over President Donald Trump’s move to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Australian Parliament allows same-sex marriages

Members of parliament, from left, Cathy McGowan, Adam Brandt and Andrew Wilkie celebrate the passing of the Marriage Amendment Bill in the House of Representatives at Parliament House in Canberra, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. Gay marriage was endorsed by 62 percent of Australian voters who responded to a government-commissioned postal ballot by last month. (Mick Tsikas/AAP Image via AP)

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s Parliament voted Thursday to allow same-sex marriage across the nation, following a bitter debate settled by a much-criticized government survey of voters that strongly endorsed change.

Tillerson: Russia arms, trains, fights with Ukraine rebels

Austrian Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, right, and U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson stand together at the OSCE ForeignMinisters in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017.(AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

VIENNA (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is lambasting Moscow for its aggression in Ukraine ahead of a meeting with Russia’s foreign minister.

Trump declares Jerusalem Israeli capital, smashing US policy

President Donald Trump holds up a proclamation to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump shattered decades of unwavering U.S. neutrality on Jerusalem Wednesday, declaring the sorely divided holy city as Israel’s capital and sparking frustrated Palestinians to cry out that he had destroyed already-fragile Mideast hopes for peace.

Doctors identify brain abnormalities in Cuba attack patients

FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, tourists ride classic convertible cars on the Malecon beside the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba. Doctors treating the U.S. Embassy victims of mysterious, invisible attacks in Cuba have discovered brain abnormalities as they search for clues to hearing, vision, balance and memory damage, The Associated Press has learned. Physicians, FBI investigators and U.S. intelligence agencies have spent months trying to piece together the puzzle in Havana, where the U.S. says 24 government officials and spouses fell ill starting last year in homes and later in some hotels. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Doctors treating the U.S. Embassy victims of mysterious, invisible attacks in Cuba have discovered brain abnormalities as they search for clues to explain the hearing, vision, balance and memory damage, The Associated Press has learned.

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