FACT CHECK: The week Trump wiretap accusation died

President Donald Trump talks about the health care overhaul bill, Friday, March 24, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Trump’s accusation that his predecessor ordered snooping of his communications has fallen apart, slapped down by the FBI chief and again by the Republican leading the House intelligence committee, a Trump ally. The president gave up on arguing that Barack Obama tapped his phones, and he doesn’t give up on anything easily. A look at how that sensational charge and a variety of other statements by the president, on Russia, immigration, health care and more, met reality checks over the past week. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s accusation that his predecessor ordered snooping of his communications has fallen apart, slapped down by the FBI chief and again by the Republican leading the House intelligence committee, a Trump ally. The president gave up on arguing that Barack Obama tapped his phones, and he doesn’t give up on anything easily.

Options for consumers as health law drama fades

Mary Vavrik poses for a photo in Anchorage, Alaska, on Friday, March 24, 2017. Vavrik said she felt a little more relaxed after Republican leaders in the U.S. House pulled its replacement bill for the Affordable Care Act, which would have caused her monthly premiums to skyrocket. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

As the political drama over health care legislation in Washington fades, the rest of the country faces a more immediate concern: Getting insurance for next year.

Ivanka: A White House force, just not an ‘employee’

FILE - In this March 17, 2017, file photo, Ivanka Trump arrives for news conference with President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Ivanka Trump will have security clearance, a West Wing office and the ear of her father on important policy matters. But don’t call her an employee. When it comes to government work, “employee” is more than just a word. That designation triggers an array of transparency and ethical provisions, including a law prohibiting conflicts of interest. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka Trump will have a security clearance, a West Wing office and the ear of her father on important policy matters. But don’t call her an employee.

Will the ‘Fearless Girl’ stay on Wall Street?

In this March 22, 2017 photo, the Charging Bull and Fearless Girl statues are sit on Lower Broadway in New York. Since 1989 the bronze bull has stood in New York City's financial district as an image of the might and hard-charging spirit of Wall Street. But the installation of the bold girl defiantly standing in the bull's path has transformed the meaning of one of New York's best-known public artworks. Pressure is mounting on the city to let the Fearless Girl stay. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

NEW YORK (AP) — Should the “Fearless Girl” stand up to Wall Street’s charging bull forever?

A violent avalanche and risk in the backcountry

ADVANCE FOR USE SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 2017, AND THEREAFTER- In this Feb. 28, 2017 photo, Sam Kapacinskas and Jake Thelen pose for a photo at Snowbird Resort in Utah. The two survived a Dec. 19 avalanche that Utah’s snow experts have described as one of the most astonishing they've ever seen first, because no one was killed or even injured. (Chris Detrick/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP)

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Jake Thelen had inched his snowboard down a ridge to follow his friend into the powder of the Birthday Chutes in Little Cottonwood Canyon when the snow around him started to move.

Cheerleaders, chambermaids: The Court’s broad reach

FILE - In this May 13, 2014, file photo National Education Association staff members from Washington joining students, parents and educators at a rally at the Supreme Court in Washington on the 60th anniversary Brown v. Board of Education decision that struck down "separate but equal" laws that kept schools segregated. From the time Americans roll out of bed in the morning until they turn in, and even who they might be spending the night with, the court's rulings are woven into daily life in ways large and small. (AP Photo)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The rhythms of daily life for ordinary Americans may seem far removed from the rarified world of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Trump reduction in refugees may hit Myanmar worst

In this March 11, 2017 photo, Tin, a Christian Burmese refugee, leaves a school after dropping off her children in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Tin is a Christian Burmese who fled Myanmar and is hoping to resettle in the United States. An Associated Press analysis suggests that the people hurt most by President Donald Trump's planned deep cuts in refugee visas are from not any of the six Muslim countries listed in his travel ban, but Myanmar. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Tin, her husband and five children have cleared years of refugee hurdles to come to the U.S.: blood tests, interviews, DNA and fingerprints, background checks. She has her one must-bring possession within reach, a well-worn Bible, and keeps their phone charged for the U.S. Embassy to call.

Gorsuch Second Amendment view a judicial mystery

FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2107 file photo, Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch, right, escorted by former New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte walks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Despite strong endorsements from some gun rights advocates, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has a sparse appeals court record on gun policy, one that leaves his view on how far the Second Amendment extends a judicial mystery. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Despite strong endorsements from some gun rights advocates, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has a slim appeals court record on the subject — a record that leaves his views a mystery on how far constitutional firearms rights extend.

School bomb-scare sparks a media vs. FBI fight

This image provided by the Lacey Police Department shows a June 14, 2007, photo of a computer taken from the bedroom of the Timberline High School bomb hoaxer in Lacey, Wash. In 2007, a teenager who was sending bomb threats to his high school in Washington state was finally caught by an FBI agent posing as a journalist. Local police raided the home hours after the FBI pinpointed his location using surveillance software. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the photo, taken by investigators, via a public records request. (Lacey Police Department via AP)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The young hacker was told in no uncertain terms: You are safe with me.

Cozy clothes may be key source of sea pollution

In this, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017 photo, Sarah Egner, director of curriculum development at Marinelab in Key Largo, Fla., takes a water sample to check for the presence of microscopic plastics in the water. Gulf Coast researchers are preparing to launch a two-year study to see what kinds of microscopic plastics can be found in the waters from south Texas to the Florida Keys. The project will expand a year's worth of data collected around the state of Florida that predominantly found microfibers, shreds of plastic even smaller than the microbeads targeted by a federal ban. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

KEY LARGO, Fla. (AP) — Comfortable clothes are emerging as a source of plastic that’s increasingly ending up in the oceans and potentially contaminating seafood, according to Gulf Coast researchers launching a two-year study of microscopic plastics in the waters from south Texas to the Florida Keys.

Pages

Subscribe to