The great rewilding

In a Oct. 26, 2017 photo, an excavator moves woody debris along a new stream channel that meanders through a meadow at Lost Trail Wildlife Refuge west of Kalispell, Mont. American landscapes in Montana and across the West share a legacy of environmental do-overs, a tradition born of mankind’s tendency to tame wild country and manipulate its natural functions to perform utilitarian tasks. (Greg Lindstrom/Flathead Beacon via AP)

KALISPELL, Mont. (AP) — Nestled in the Pleasant Valley floodplain and flanked by rolling foothills, the fledgling creek channel navigates newly planted pods of native willow and dogwood trees. Its sculpted banks — supported by a tiered matrix of root balls, splintered spruce and mats of greenery — form calculated bends that meander across a denuded valley floor.

A look at baseball’s greatest teams — one for each franchise

FILE - This undated file photo shows Shoeless Joe Jackson. In 1917, two years before their scandalous appearance in the 1919 World Series, the White Sox beat the Giants in the World Series and Jackson batted .301. (AP Photo, File)

The 2017 baseball season has in many ways been defined by the dominance of three teams.

Five years after Sandy, the lessons haven’t sunk in

This illustration provided by Rebuild by Design in October 2017 shows a flood-mitigation design for the Manhattan borough of New York. The BIG U proposal calls for a 10-mile protective system around the low-lying southern part of the island. The proposal is part of the Rebuild by Design competition to create infrastructure that would protect coastal areas affected by Superstorm Sandy. (The BIG Team/Rebuild by Design via AP)

Five years after Superstorm Sandy was supposed to have taught the U.S. a lesson about the dangers of living along the coast, disaster planning experts say there is no place in America truly prepared for climate change and the tempests it could bring.

Growth of e-commerce could mean more jobs

In this Aug. 3, 2017, photo, Myrtice Harris packages products for shipment at an Amazon fulfillment center in Baltimore. While jobs have been lost in brick-and-mortar stores, many more have been gained from e-commerce and warehousing. Amazon accounts for much of the additional employment. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the robots came to online retailer Boxed, dread came, too: The familiar fear that the machines would take over, leaving a trail of unemployed humans in their wake.

‘We made it’: Imprisoned at 15, lifer goes free at 43

Bobby Hines poses for a portrait at his sister's home in Detroit, Sept. 12, 2017 after being released from prison. Getting out, he said, is like being born again. “If you were to die and you were to go to hell and see all of the destruction and fighting and killing down there and God were to breathe life back into you and you were given a second chance _ that’s what this is.” (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

DETROIT (AP) — Bobby Hines stepped forward, smiling as he embraced the sister of the man he was convicted of killing.

Belgium doctors clash over euthanasia for mentally ill

In this Thursday, June 29, 2017 photo, psychiatrist Dr. Lieve Thienpont, right, speaks with Amy De Schutter, who received approval for euthanasia about a year ago, in Ghent, Belgium, one of the few countries that allow for euthanasia. Thienpont, a doctor, respected psychiatrist and prominent euthanasia advocate, believes that when modern medicine can’t relieve suffering, euthanasia, when doctors actively kill patients, should be an option. (AP Photo/Maria Cheng)

GHENT, Belgium (AP) — After struggling with mental illness for years, Cornelia Geerts was so desperate to die that she asked her psychiatrist to kill her.

Cub Scout kicked out after gun control question to lawmaker

FILE - In this March, 5, 2009, file photo, Vicki Marble, a Larimer County bail business owner, speaks during an interview in Loveland, Colo. A Cub Scout was kicked out of his group after he questioned Republican state Sen. Marble about gun control and previous contentious comments she made about African-Americans. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey, File)

DENVER (AP) — A Cub Scout was kicked out of his den after he questioned a Colorado state lawmaker about her position on gun control and previous comments she made about African-Americans’ health and eating fried chicken.

Plenty of bereaved military families did not hear from Trump

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly stands next to the podium while speaking to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some got sympathy and solace. Some got silence. One got a promise of cash.

Wrongful conviction no surprise to black community

FILE - In this Oct. 13, 2017, file photo, Lamonte McIntyre, who was imprisoned for 23 years for a 1994 double murder in Kansas that he always said he didn't commit, walks out of a courthouse in Kansas City, Kan., with his mother, Rosie McIntyre, after the district attorney dropped the charges. Kansas legislators expect to consider proposals next year to make it easier for people wrongly convicted of major crimes to win compensation from the state. (Tammy Ljungblad /The Kansas City Star via AP, File)

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Rose McIntyre says she wonders whether her refusal to grant regular sexual favors to a white detective prompted him to retaliate against her black son, who spent 23 years in a Kansas prison for a double murder he didn’t commit.

Native American Marine considered a homeland hero

In this Oct. 5, 2017 photo, Jesse DesRosier, Blackfoot language instructor at Cuts Wood School poses in Browning, Mont. DesRosier’s 28-year journey is a dizzying endeavor, even if he’s right back where he started - living on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, a community that at once seems tucked away and exposed, situated on an ecological nexus where rolling, wind-whipped foothills meet the jagged expanse of the Rocky Mountain Front and the birthplace of the Blackfeet creation story. (Greg Lindstrom /Flathead Beacon via AP)

KALISPELL, Mont. (AP) — Charting Jesse DesRosier’s 28-year journey is a dizzying endeavor, even if he’s right back where he started — living on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, a community that at once seems tucked away and exposed, situated on an ecological nexus where rolling, wind-whipped foothills meet the jagged expanse of the Rocky Mountain Front and the birthplace of the Blackfeet creation story.

Pages

ADVERTISEMENT

Subscribe to