Chinese propaganda faces competition from celebrities

In this Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017 photo, Chinese women walk past advertisement featuring teen idol Lu Han, also known as China's Justin Bieber in Beijing, China. China works to stifle celebrities as it seeks to dictate the values the nation’s youth should embrace. It’s part of the most ambitious effort in years to shape the country’s booming entertainment industry. Instead of selfish, rich stars, the state is promoting performers who are all about patriotism, purity and other values that support the party’s legitimacy, whether in movies about revolutionary heroes or through rap music. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

HONG KONG (AP) — When the propaganda film, “The Founding of an Army,” hit theaters in China recently, the reaction wasn’t quite what the ruling Communist Party might have hoped for.

Amid Trump ambiguity, is U.S. practicing for war?

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Do the ominous rhetoric from President Donald Trump and repeated flights by U.S. strategic bombers over the Korean Peninsula mean Washington is readying for what many feel is unthinkable — a military conflict with a nuclear-armed North Korea that would put millions of civilians at risk?

A look at some who died in California wildfires

This June 18, 2017, photo released by Derek Southard, left, shows himself with his father, Daniel Southard, after Derek graduated as a Chemical Engineer from the University of California, Davis, in Sacramento, Calif. The body of Daniel Southard, 71, a retired fitness trainer and high school football coach, was found in his bedroom after wildfires tore through Santa Rosa. (Anna Paseka via AP)

At least 40 people have died in the deadliest week of wildfires in California history. The victims include a couple who recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary, a 14-year-old boy whose parents and older sister were severely burned, and a woman born with a spinal defect who worked to help others despite her own troubles.

In Harvey-hit county, some in GOP rethink climate

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, OCT. 16, 2017 AND THEREAFTER-Wayne Christopher plays the keys on a piano put out on the curb in Port Arthur, Texas, Monday, Sept. 25, 2017, next to pews from the Memorial Baptist Church which he'd attended his whole life. The damage was caused by Hurricane Harvey a month earlier. "He's not too up on global warming, and that's a shame," Christopher said of the president he supported in November, and supports still. He also believes in the consensus among scientists that climate change is real and that this disastrous run of weather, from droughts in the west to wildfires to catastrophic hurricanes along the coasts, is a preview of the future if the country doesn't begin to take the problem seriously. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

PORT ARTHUR, Texas (AP) — The church was empty, except for the piano too heavy for one man to move. It had been 21 days since the greatest storm Wayne Christopher had ever seen dumped a year’s worth of rain on his town, drowning this church where he was baptized, met his high school sweetheart and later married her.

Trump sparks a new war of words between U.S., Iran

Iranian women walk past a clothes shop in downtown Tehran, Iran, Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017. President Donald Trump's refusal to certify the Iran nuclear deal has sparked a new war of words between the Islamic Republic and America, fueling growing mistrust and a sense of nationalism among Iranians. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — President Donald Trump’s refusal to certify the Iran nuclear deal has sparked a new war of words between the Islamic Republic and America, fueling growing mistrust and a sense of nationalism among Iranians.

Pro-Trump states most affected by health care move

President Donald Trump speaks to the 2017 Value Voters Summit, Friday, Oct. 13, 2017, in Washington. Trump’s decision to end a provision of the Affordable Care Act that has benefited an estimated 6 million Americans helps fulfill a campaign promise, but it also risks harming some of the very people who helped him win the presidency. Nearly 70 percent of those benefiting from the so-called cost-sharing subsidies live in states Trump won last November, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump’s decision to end a provision of the Affordable Care Act that was benefiting roughly 6 million Americans helps fulfill a campaign promise, but it also risks harming some of the very people who helped him win the presidency.

Report: Trump-tied lobbyists cashing in

FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2016, file photo, supporters of then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump hold signs during a campaign rally in Springfield, Ohio. Despite President Donald Trump’s campaign to “drain the swamp” of lobbyists and special interests, Washington’s influence industry is alive and well _ and growing. Former members of the Trump transition team, presidential campaign, administration and friends have set up shop as lobbyists and cashed in on connections, according to a new analysis by Public Citizen, a public interest group, and reviewed by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, file)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The day after the presidential election, the Washington lobbying firm Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck touted its Republican team’s “significant relationships … with those who will steer the incoming Trump administration.” It highlighted Marc Lampkin, managing partner of its Washington office and a Trump fundraiser.

Toyota closure latest in Australian “Carmageddon”

In this photo provided by Toyota Australia the last Toyota car produced in Australia is displayed for gathered workers in Melbourne, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Toyota closed its manufacturing plant in Melbourne, ending 54 years of production by the Japanese firm in Australia, the first country outside of Japan where the company made cars. (Toyota Australia via AP)

SYDNEY (AP) — After looming for four years, “Carmageddon” has hit the Australian auto industry.

Feds: No threatened species listing for walrus

FILE - In this April 18, 2004, file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific walrus cows and yearlings rest on ice in Alaska. The Trump administration will not add Pacific walrus to the threatened species list. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, that it can't say with certainty that walrus are likely to become endangered despite an extensive loss of Arctic sea ice due to global warming. (Joel Garlich-Miller/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Trump administration announced Wednesday it will not list the Pacific walrus as a threatened species based on diminished Arctic Ocean sea ice, concluding that the marine mammals have adapted to the loss by foraging from coastlines.

Diverse U.S. divided on symbols of patriotism

In this June 29, 2017 photo, Joseph Smith, 32, a U.S. Army veteran, sits outside his home in Houston's Freedmen's Town. Smith says he was not offended by NFL players protesting the national anthem. A silent protest initially started by a San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick last year in response to police killings of minorities has become a measure on patriotism and the nation's symbols, drawing heated responses from some including President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

FREEDMEN’S TOWN, Texas (AP) — When Afghanistan War veteran Joseph Smith saw NFL players take a knee or raise a fist during the playing of the national anthem last month, he wasn’t offended — he was proud. Where some saw it as disrespectful, he saw it as patriotic.

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