Attacks in Havana hit U.S. spy network in Cuba

FILE - In a Friday, Sept. 29, 2017 file photo, staff stand within the United States embassy facility in Havana, Cuba. The terrifying attacks in Cuba overwhelmingly hit U.S. intelligence operatives in Havana, not ordinary diplomats, when they began within days of President Donald Trump’s election, The Associated Press has learned. To date, the Trump administration largely described the victims as U.S. Embassy personnel or “members of the diplomatic community,” suggesting it was bona fide diplomats who were hit. That spies, working under diplomatic cover, comprised the majority of the early victims adds an entirely new element of mystery to what’s harmed at least 21 Americans over the last year. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan, File)

HAVANA (AP) — Frightening attacks on U.S. personnel in Havana struck the heart of America’s spy network in Cuba, with intelligence operatives among the first and most severely affected victims, The Associated Press has learned.

Hurricane Maria a reminder of ‘second-class’ status

Emari Rodriguez poses for a portrait after filling up bottles at a water distribution center to take it home, which is intact, but lacks water and electricity, in the wake of Hurricane Maria in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Rodriguez, who lacks water and electricity at home, but which is still in tact, said she's most worried about the elderly in her neighborhood. "We need the electricity to return, since the elderly won't hold up much more with this situation. We need to move forward." (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Xavier Totti moved to the mainland United States from his native Puerto Rico 43 years ago. He is still asked routinely if he is “legal,” and when he mails packages to relatives back home, he has to fill out an international form.

San Juan mayor in spotlight after Trump tweets

San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz arrives at the San Francisco hospital during the evacuation of patients after an electrical plant failure, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017. President Donald Trump is lashing out at the mayor of Puerto Rico's capital city in a war of words over recovery efforts after Hurricane Maria smashed into the U.S. territory.
Trump is out with a series of tweets criticizing Cruz for criticizing the Trump administration's hurricane response. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — In Puerto Rico’s hurricane-ravaged capital, it seems Carmen Yulin Cruz is everywhere these days: handing out bags of ice, wading through chest-deep floodwaters, hugging people in need of comfort.

Maria reporting raises echoes of Katrina coverage

Marta Sostre Vazquez reacts as she starts to wade into the San Lorenzo Morovis River with her family in Morovis, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, after a bridge was swept away by Hurricane Maria. The family was returning to their home after visiting family on the other side. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

NEW YORK (AP) — As the days pass since Hurricane Maria ripped across Puerto Rico, television reports increasingly echo those after Katrina a dozen years ago in sounding the alarm for a desperate population frustrated by the pace of relief efforts.

Supreme Court conservatives on rise as term begins

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch gestures as he acknowledges applause from the audience as he beings to speak at the 50th anniversary of the Fund for America Studies luncheon at the Trump Hotel in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Disputes over a wedding cake for a same-sex couple and partisan electoral maps top the Supreme Court’s agenda in the first full term of the Trump presidency. Conservatives will look for a boost from the newest justice, Neil Gorsuch, in a year that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has said will be momentous.

NFL players angry over Trump’s insult to mothers

Member of the Washington Redskins stand arm in arm during the playing of the National Anthem before an NFL football game against the Oakland Raiders in Landover, Md., Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Donald Trump probably didn’t realize he’d struck such a nerve with NFL players when he implored team owners to “get that son of a bitch off the field” for protesting during the national anthem.

Segregation lingers 60 years after Little Rock

FILE - In this Sept. 25, 1957, file photo, nine African American students enter Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., escorted by troops of the 101st Airborne Division. (AP Photo/File)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Among the most lasting and indelible images of the civil rights movement were the nine black teenagers who had to be escorted by federal troops past an angry white mob and through the doors of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, on Sept. 25, 1957.

Ex-members accuse church of unemployment scam

Former Word of Faith Fellowship church member Rachael Bryant poses for a photo with her tax records at her home in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. She and 10 other members of the evangelical North Carolina-based church say their leader, Jane Whaley, coerced congregants into filing false unemployment claims after the faltering economy threatened weekly tithes from church-affiliated companies. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

SPINDALE, N.C. (AP) — When Randy Fields’ construction company faced potential ruin because of the cratering economy, he pleaded with his pastor at Word of Faith Fellowship church to reduce the amount of money he was required to tithe every week.

Studying 1M people to end cookie-cutter health care

In this Aug. 7, 2017, photo, Kenneth Parker Ulrich, left, a research technician at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, prepares to collect a blood sample from Erricka Hager, a participant in the "All of Us" research program in Pittsburgh. The "All of Us" research program is run by the National Institutes of Health and plans to track the health of at least 1 million volunteers by 2019. By doing so, researchers hope to learn how to better tailor treatments and preventative care to people's genes, environments, and lifestyle. The University of Pittsburgh is running a pilot program with some of the first enrollees in the study. (AP Photo/Dake Kang)

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact.

Trump hopes to turn around health bill holdouts

FILE - In this July 27, 2017, file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. McCain says he won't vote for the Republican bill repealing the Obama health care law. His statement likely deals a fatal blow to the last-gasp GOP measure in a Senate showdown expected next week. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, file)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unwilling to concede defeat on a bedrock GOP promise, President Donald Trump on Saturday tried to sway two Republican holdouts on the party’s last-ditch health care hope while clawing at his nemesis who again has brought the “Obamacare” repeal-and-replace effort to the brink of failure.

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