Gros Ventre wolf war is underway

Ken Mills, a Wyoming Game and Fish Department large carnivore biologist, inspects the carcass of 1037F, a three-year-old female wolf from the Togwotee pack that had likely been killed in a scuffle with the Slate Creek pack. “This is really dynamic stuff,” Mills said of recent changes in the Gros Ventre. “Wolves are acting kind of like Yellowstone wolves right now when they’re at a high density and stressed.” Ryan Dorgan / News & Guide

Save for trails of scurrying rodents and occasional deep depressions from moose, the snowbanks lining Gros Ventre Road were largely untouched as Ken Mills snowmobiled upriver.

Idaho’s state parks add $184 million to state’s economy in 2016

Plummer Creek flows through the wetlands at Heyburn State Park near Plummer in this 2008 file photo. The park is the oldest in Idaho. Idaho’s state parks contributed $184 million to the state’s economy in 2016, according to a new study. Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review

Idaho’s state parks contributed $184 million to the state’s economy in 2016, according to a new study.

Wildlife management can be a touchy subject

Cats are fine animals and make great pets. However, they belong in the house, not out in the field where they can prey on wildlife.

I received the following note on my website, nature-track.com, from Kari of San Antonio, Texas: “Just read your hit piece on skunks. Some nature blogger you are. Prepare to be famous among every skunk fancier (wild and domestic) from South Texas to Canada. I’ll bet you’d have a nervous breakdown if anyone proposed treated (sic) free ranging feral cats the same way. What a creep!”

No clear answer for Jackson Hole’s elk problem

Wyoming Game & Fish warden Jon Stephens glasses a group of elk on a hillside in Spring Gulch in early January. Stephens was making contact with hunters with permission to hunt on the private land and hoping to land a trophy bull. Bradly J. Boner / News & Guide

JACKSON, Wyo. — The calls to Game Warden Jon Stephens’ cellphone usually start up as April’s snowpack recedes and animals stream off the National Elk Refuge by the hundreds.

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