US lands agency makeover would diminish Washington’s power

FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2018, file photo, U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks to reporters at a conservation announcement at the Western Conservation and Hunting Expo in Salt Lake City. On Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, Zinke will announce he will revise proposed new regional boundaries for the Interior Department as part of a major reorganization of the agency. The new boundaries would more closely follow state lines, a change from his earlier proposal, which largely ignored state boundaries and relied mostly on rivers and other natural features. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

BILLINGS, Mont. — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is revamping a planned sweeping overhaul of his department with a new organizational map that more closely follows state lines instead of the natural boundaries he initially proposed, he told The Associated Press on Friday in an exclusive interview.

Montana man readies for his 24th year trapping grizzlies

Chad Dickinson, a biological science technician for the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, explains how a grizzly bear trap works in July 2017 in the Gravelly Mountain Range. Rachel Leathe / Bozeman Chronicle

If you were to imagine someone who traps grizzly bears for a living, you’d imagine someone like Chad Dickinson. Large, bearded, deep-voiced. The kind of guy who would much rather be deep in the woods than in an office talking to a newspaper reporter.

Turmoil shakes up agency in charge of US lands

FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2017 file photo, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks on the Trump Administration's energy policy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington. A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and repeated complaints that dissenting views have been sidelined. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

BILLINGS, Mont. — A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and a sweeping reorganization proposed for its 70,000 employees.

Idaho’s state parks add $184 million to state’s economy in 2016

Plummer Creek flows through the wetlands at Heyburn State Park near Plummer in this 2008 file photo. The park is the oldest in Idaho. Idaho’s state parks contributed $184 million to the state’s economy in 2016, according to a new study. Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review

Idaho’s state parks contributed $184 million to the state’s economy in 2016, according to a new study.

Pages

ADVERTISEMENT

Subscribe to