Tourism industry wants to pay its own way

Teton County particularly, and Wyoming generally, has a bustling tourism industry — as is often evident at the popular Bubba’s Bar-B-Que in Jackson. A new tax being considered by the Revenue Committee would apply a one percent “tourism tax” to restaurants like Bubba’s. Angus M. Thuermer Jr. / WyoFile

Members of the Joint Revenue Committee faced an unusual phenomenon at their meeting last week in Buffalo, Wyo.: Representatives of an industry appearing in unison to request a tax hike.

Excitement bubbles up at BYU over caffeinated soda

Greg Bird fills his cup with Coca Cola on campus at Brigham Young University on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. According to an online statement from Dean Wright, director of Dining Services, some locations on campus have started serving caffeinated beverages and it will be offered at sporting events. (Sammy Jo Hester/The Daily Herald via AP)

PROVO, Utah (AP) — Mormon church-owned Brigham Young University ended a six-decade ban Thursday on the sale of caffeinated soft drinks on campus, surprising students by posting a picture of a can of Coca-Cola on Twitter and just two words: “It’s happening.”

Montana to take over deadly asbestos cleanup site

FILE - In this April 27, 2011 photo, the entrance to downtown Libby, Mont., is seen. The cleanup of the northwest Montana community where health officials say hundreds of people have been killed by asbestos exposure entered a new phase Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, as officials begin crafting ways to keep residents safe over the long term. The five-member Libby Asbestos Superfund Advisory Team was scheduled to meet for the first time after being established by the Montana Legislature earlier this year. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The cleanup of a northwest Montana community where health professionals say hundreds of people have been killed by asbestos exposure entered a new phase Thursday as officials turn their focus to keeping residents safe over the long term.

On last day of summer, snow falls in Sierra Nevada

In this image provided by Kirkwood Mountain Resort, the first snow of the season is seen looking up at the Wall ski run Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in Kirkwood, Calif. Snow is falling in the Sierra Nevada on the last day of summer, dusting hills and ski resorts with fresh snow and stoking excitement for an early skiing season. (Kirkwood Mountain Resort via AP)

TRUCKEE, Calif. (AP) — Snow fell in the Sierra Nevada on the last day of summer, giving the towering mountain range shared by California and Nevada a wintry look in September and making travel hazardous.

Geologists warn of landslides in Gorge

This photo provided by KATU-TV shows the Eagle Creek wildfire as seen from Stevenson Wash., across the Columbia River, burning in the Columbia River Gorge above Cascade Locks, Ore., on Monday Sept. 4, 2017. Wildfire smoke is especially dangerous to people with chronic heart and lung problems, said Julie Fox, an environmental epidemiologist with the Washington State Department of Health. The smoke is a combination of several toxins, and its tiny particles can be inhaled deeply into the lungs, she said. (Tristan Fortsch/KATU-TV via AP)

Geologists for the state of Oregon are warning of the risk of major landslides in parts of the Columbia River Gorge that were hit by wildfires this year.

Vegas anti-human trafficking campaign kicks off

A billboard displays a phone number for the National Human Trafficking Hotline, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in Las Vegas. The FBI in Las Vegas is teaming with a billboard company to raise the profile in the fight to stop human trafficking in a state where brothels are legal in rural counties, but prostitution is illegal in cities like Las Vegas and Reno. (AP Photo/John Locher)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The FBI in Las Vegas is teaming with an advertising company donating billboard space to raise the profile of efforts to stop human trafficking in a state where brothels are legal in rural counties, but prostitution is illegal in cities such as Las Vegas and Reno, officials said Thursday.

Vegas police change neck restraint policy

Sgt. Esmeralda Boveda of the Las Vegas police department speaks during a news conference Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in Las Vegas. Las Vegas police officers can no longer routinely use neck restraints to render combative people unconscious, but can still use the department-approved technique in a life-or-death struggle.(AP Photo/John Locher)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Police in Las Vegas have changed use-of-force policies to stop routine use of neck restraints that render people unconscious after the death of a man and findings that a department-taught technique was used 632 times over a decade, officials said Thursday.

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