Militia leader pleads guilty in attempted cabin explosion

FILE - This undated file photo from the Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office shows William Keebler. Keebler has pleaded guilty to trying to blow up a federally owned cabin in Arizona in what prosecutors call a case of domestic terrorism. Keebler pleaded guilty to attempting to damage federal property Thursday, April 26, 2018. (Salt Lake County Sheriffs Office via AP, File)

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Utah militia group leader pleaded guilty Thursday to trying to blow up a federally owned cabin in Arizona in what prosecutors call a case of domestic terrorism.

Burning Man festival co-founder dead at 70

This Aug. 30, 2011 photo shows Larry Harvey, co-founder of the Burning Man festival, during a party at Media Mecca, the communications center during the festival in the Black Rock Desert in Northern Nevada. Burning Man Project CEO Marian Goodell says Harvey died Saturday, April 28, 2018 at a hospital in San Francisco. He was 70. (John Curley via AP)

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Larry Harvey, whose whimsical decision to erect a giant wooden figure and then burn it to the ground led to the popular, long-running counterculture celebration known as “Burning Man,” has died. He was 70.

Families of slain teens preparing for long court case

Jerrod Baum appears for a hearing before Judge Christine Johnson, in the 4th District Court Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Provo, Utah. Prosecutors say 41-year-old Baum became angry after a young couple visited his live-in girlfriend. The victims, 17-year-old Brelynne "Breezy" Otteson and 18-year-old Powell, were missing for nearly three months before their bodies were found down an abandoned mine shaft. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune, via AP, Pool)

PROVO, Utah (AP) — Family members of two Utah teenagers whose bound bodies were found down an abandoned mine shaft say they’re preparing for long criminal case for the man accused in their deaths.

US won’t restore Yellowstone grizzly protections

FILE - In this June 2011, file photo, grizzly bear No. 399 crosses a road in Grand Teton National Park, Wyo., with her three cubs. U.S. officials said Friday, April 27, 2018, that they will not restore federal protections for Yellowstone-area grizzly bears despite a court ruling that called into question the government's rationale for placing the animals under state management. (AP photo/Tom Mangelsen, File)

BILLINGS, Mont. — U.S. officials will not restore federal protections for Yellowstone-area grizzly bears, despite a court ruling that called into question the government’s rationale for turning management over to states that are now planning public hunts for the animals, according to an announcement Friday in in the Federal Register.

U.S. won’t restore Yellowstone grizzly bear protections

FILE - In this June 2011, file photo, grizzly bear No. 399 crosses a road in Grand Teton National Park, Wyo., with her three cubs. U.S. officials said Friday, April 27, 2018, that they will not restore federal protections for Yellowstone-area grizzly bears despite a court ruling that called into question the government's rationale for placing the animals under state management. (AP photo/Tom Mangelsen, File)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials will not restore federal protections for Yellowstone-area grizzly bears, despite a court ruling that called into question the government’s rationale for turning grizzly management over to states that are now planning public hunts for the animals, according to an announcement Friday in in the Federal Register.

Wyoming fans pack Laramie bar to cheer for QB Josh Allen

Travis Anusavice, center, cheers with other fans at a bar in Laramie, Wyo., after former Wyoming quarterback Josh Allen was selected by the Buffalo Bills in the NFL football draft, Thursday, April 26, 2018. (Josh Galemore/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP)

LARAMIE, Wyo. (AP) — For the first time ever, a University of Wyoming player was among the top 10 picks in the first round of the NFL draft — and Cowboys fans came out to loudly celebrate their venerated quarterback.

Agency may offer $1,000 to people who adopt wild horses

FILE - In this May 25, 2017, file photo, wild horses that were captured from U.S. rangeland stand stand in a holding pen, at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Wild Horse and Burro Center in Palomino Valley about 20 miles north of Reno, Nev. Pressing again for authority to sterilize, euthanize or sell for slaughter tens of thousands of wild horses roaming public lands in the West, U.S. land managers have added a new idea for culling overpopulated herds, a $1,000 paycheck for those who adopt one. Overwhelmed by what it calls a $1 billion problem, the Bureau of Land Management trotted out the novel approach in a suite of options presented to Congress this week.(AP Photo/Scott Sonner, File)

RENO, Nev. (AP) — U.S. land managers are proposing offering $1,000 to anyone willing to adopt wild horses gathered from public lands to alleviate a backlog of mustangs in government corals and shrink what they say are badly overpopulated herds across the West.

Navajo Nation leaders protest Utah candidate investigation

FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2016, file photo, shows Willie Grayeyes, of the Utah Dine Bikeyah raising his hand as he is recognized during a news conference, in Salt Lake City. Navajo Nation leaders are protesting a Utah county's investigation into a Navajo candidate's residency, saying it's an attempt to disqualify a native contender after a federal judge decided voting districts discriminated against Navajos. San Juan County spokeswoman Natalie Callahan countered Friday, April 27, 2018, that the investigation into a citizen complaint questioning whether Democratic candidate Willie Grayeyes lives on the Utah side of the nearby Arizona border isn't related to politics or race. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Navajo Nation leaders are protesting a Utah county’s investigation into a Navajo candidate’s residency, saying it’s an attempt to disqualify a native contender after a federal judge decided voting districts discriminated against Navajo voters.

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