Former Idaho Gov. Andrus dies at 85

In this Oct. 14, 2001, file photo, former Indaho governor and Interior Secretary Cecil V. Andrus poses for a photo at his office in Boise, Idaho. Andrus, who engineered the conservation of millions of acres of Alaska land during the Carter administration, has died. He was 85. Andrus died late Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017 of complications from lung cancer, daughter Tracy Andrus said. (Katherine Jones/Idaho Statesman via AP, File)

BOISE (AP) — Former Interior Secretary Cecil V. Andrus, who engineered the conservation of millions of acres of Alaska land during the Carter administration, has died. He was 85. Andrus died late Wednesday of complications from lung cancer, daughter Tracy Andrus said.

Flash, bang, and blood: Hiker tells lightning tale

Some of the wounds Mathias Steinhuber received from being struck by a lighting bolt are seen on his right foot as he discusses the near-fatal event, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. His left foot, where the lightning exited his body, is wrapped. Steinhuber, of Innsbruck, Austria, had been hiking the Pacific Crest Trail near Donner Summit Tuesday when he stopped to take a photo and was hit by the lighting. He was taken by helicopter to the the Tahoe Forest Hospital in Truckee, before being flown to the University of California, Davis Hospital Burn Center where he is listed in fair condition. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — There was no rain, no rumbling, no sign of danger before the blinding flash and deafening bang of a lightning bolt threw Mathias Steinhuber to the ground, tore off his clothes and burned a gaping hole in his shoe.

Collapse at salmon farm renews fish farming debate

In this Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017 photo, Riley Starks of Lummi Island Wild shows three of the farm raised Atlantic salmon that were caught alongside four healthy Kings in Point Williams, Wash. A marine net pen holding 305,000 farmed Atlantic salmon collapsed recently, releasing thousands of fish into Puget Sound and renewing concerns that a new proposed salmon farm could harm wild salmon stock and cause other environmental damage. (Dean Rutz/The Seattle Times via AP)

SEATTLE (AP) — A marine net pen holding 305,000 farmed Atlantic salmon collapsed recently, releasing thousands of fish into Puget Sound and renewing concerns that a new proposed salmon farm could harm wild salmon stock and cause other environmental damage.

Four more religious sect members arrested in N.M.

In this undated photo, James Green, co-leader of the Aggressive Christianity Missions Training Corps, waits in the parking lot of the Cibola County Magistrate Court in Grants, N.M. Four members of the New Mexico paramilitary religious sect rocked by child sexual abuse allegations were arrested while trying to flee the state in two vans full of children, authorities said Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017. (Adron Gardner/Gallup Independent via AP)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Four members of a New Mexico paramilitary religious sect rocked by child sexual abuse allegations were arrested while trying to flee the state in two vans full of children, authorities said Thursday.

Judge sends Vegas water pipeline plan back to feds

FILE - This March 23, 2012, file photo shows pipes extending into Lake Mead well above the high water mark near Boulder City, Nev. A federal judge tapped the brakes Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, but didn't stop a proposal for a massive and expensive water pipeline to draw underground water from rural valleys in arid eastern Nevada to supply the growing Las Vegas metropolitan area. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — A federal judge tapped the brakes Thursday but didn’t stop a proposal for a massive and expensive water pipeline to draw underground water from rural valleys along Nevada’s eastern edge to supply the growing Las Vegas metropolitan area.

Investigators say U.S. land agent took evidence

FILE - In this Aug. 19, 2009 file photo, Daniel Love, a special agent with the Bureau of Land Management, walks in front of Carl "Vern" Crites' home in Durango Colo., after Crites voluntarily turned over his entire collection of ancient artifacts during a sweeping federal investigation of looting and grave-robbing in the Four Corners region. In a report released Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017, federal investigators released a report that says Love took valuable stones held as evidence and distributed them "like candy" to colleagues and a contractor. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP, File)

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Bureau of Land Management agent who has been scrutinized for past behavior took valuable stones held as evidence and handed them out “like candy” to colleagues and a contractor, federal investigators said in a report made public Thursday.

Zinke won’t eliminate any national monuments

FILE - In this May 28, 2013, file photo, a hiker walks on a rock formation known as The Wave in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said he's recommending that none of 27 national monuments carved from wilderness and ocean and under review by the Trump administration be eliminated, including the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. (AP Photo/Brian Witte, File)

BILLINGS, Mont. — Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced Thursday he won’t seek to rescind any national monuments carved from the wilderness and oceans by past presidents. But he said he will press for some boundary changes and left open the possibility of allowing drilling, mining or other industries on the sites.

Tribes join blitz to save national monument areas

FILE - In this May 9, 2017, file photo, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke rides a horse in the new Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah. Conservation groups are airing TV ads, planning rallies and creating parody websites in a last-minute blitz to persuade Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to refrain from reducing or eliminating large swaths of land across the country that have been designated as national monuments, Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017. (Scott G Winterton/The Deseret News via AP, File)

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Conservation and tribal groups are airing TV ads, sending letters to President Donald Trump and creating parody websites in a last-minute blitz to stop Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke from downsizing or eliminating national monument areas that cover large swaths of land and water from Maine to California.

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