First clues emerge about Cuba’s future under new president

Cuba's new president Miguel Diaz-Canel, left, and former president Raul Castro, salutes, after Diaz-Canel was elected as the island nation's new president, at the National Assembly in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, April 19, 2018. Castro left the presidency after 12 years in office when the National Assembly approved Diaz-Canel's nomination as the candidate for the top government position. (Alexandre Meneghini/Pool via AP)

HAVANA (AP) — Miguel Diaz-Canel has been the presumptive next president of Cuba since 2013, when Raul Castro named the laconic former provincial official to the important post of first vice president and lauded him as “neither a novice nor an improviser,” high praise in a system dedicated to continuity over all.

Australia won’t abandon S. China Sea patrols after encounter

In this Thursday, April 19, 2018, photo, Royal Australian Navy frigate HMAS Anzac prepares to dock at Saigon port in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. It was one of the three Australian Navy ships to make a four-day port call in Vietnam. Australia's Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the Australian navy has a "perfect right" to traverse the South China Sea after a media report Friday that the Chinese navy had challenged three Australian warships in the hotly contested waterway. (Van Khoa/Thanh Nien News via AP)

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s prime minister said his country has a “perfect right” to traverse the South China Sea after a media report Friday that the Chinese navy challenged three Australian warships in the hotly contested waterway.

Indonesia’s Aceh canes couples for public shows of affection

A Shariah law official whips a woman who is convicted of prostitution during a public caning outside a mosque in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, Friday, April 20, 2018. Indonesia's deeply conservative Aceh province on Friday caned several unmarried couples for showing affection in public and two women for prostitution before an enthusiastic audience of hundreds. The canings were possibly the last to be carried out before large crowds in Aceh after the province's governor announced earlier this month that the punishments would be moved indoors. (AP Photo/Heri Juanda)

BANDA ACEH, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia’s deeply conservative Aceh province on Friday caned several unmarried couples for showing affection in public and two women for prostitution before an enthusiastic audience of hundreds.

Myanmar policeman testifies arrested reporters were set up

Reuters journalist Wa Lone, center, thumbs up as he is escorted by police upon arrival at the court for trial in Yangon, Myanmar Friday, April 20, 2018. Myanmar court continues hearing on case against two Reuters journalists, arrested under the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, for having restricted documents in their possession. (AP Photo/Thein Zaw)

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — The prosecution of two Myanmar journalists accused of violating a state secrets law by acquiring official documents given to them by police suffered a major setback Friday when a police officer testified that he and his colleagues were ordered to entrap the reporters.

Nobel body: ‘unacceptable behavior’ not widely known

Women wear high-necked blouses with a loosely tied bow at the neck as people gathered on Stortorget square outside the headquarters of the Swedish Academy, to demand all of its remaining members resign, in Stockholm, Thursday April 19, 2018. Thousands of protesters called Thursday for the resignation of the secretive board that awards the Nobel Prize in Literature after a sex-abuse scandal linked to the prestigious Swedish academy forced the ouster of its first-ever woman head and tarnished the reputation of the coveted prize. (Jonas Ekstromer / TT via AP)

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — An investigation into sexual misconduct allegations at the Swedish body that hands out the coveted Nobel Prize in Literature found Friday that “unacceptable behavior in the form of unwanted intimacy” has taken place within the ranks of the prestigious institution.

In Comey memos, Trump talks of jailed journalists, ‘hookers’

Copies of the memos written by former FBI Director James Comey are photographed in Washington, Thursday, April 19, 2018. President Donald Trump told former FBI Director James Comey that he had serious concerns about the judgment of his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, according to memos maintained by Comey and obtained by The Associated Press. The 15 pages of documents contain new details about a series of interactions that Comey had with Trump in the weeks before his May 2017 firing. Those encounters include a White House dinner at which Comey says Trump asked him for his loyalty. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a series of startlingly candid conversations, President Donald Trump told former FBI Director James Comey that he had serious concerns about the judgment of a top adviser, asked about the possibility of jailing journalists and described a boast from Vladimir Putin about Russian prostitutes, according to Comey’s notes of the talks obtained by The Associated Press on Thursday night.

Men arrested at Starbucks get an apology from police

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross speaks to the media during a news conference, Thursday, April 19, 2018 in Philadelphia. Ross apologized to the two black men who were arrested at a Starbucks, saying that the issue of race is not lost on him and he shouldn't be the person making things worse. (David Swanson/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Rashon Nelson initially brushed it off when the Starbucks manager told him he couldn’t use the restroom because he wasn’t a paying customer.

As Prince’s health waned, alarm grew in inner circle

FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007 file photo, Prince performs during the halftime show at the Super Bowl XLI football game at Dolphin Stadium in Miami. A Minnesota doctor accused of illegally prescribing an opioid painkiller for Prince a week before the musician died from a fentanyl overdose has agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a federal civil violation, according to documents made public Thursday, April 19, 2018. Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Some of Prince’s closest confidants had grown increasingly alarmed about his health in the days before he died and tried to get him help as they realized he had an opioid addiction — yet none were able to give investigators the insight they needed to determine where the musician got the fentanyl that killed him, according to investigative documents released Thursday.

Trump legal team in Russia probe gets Rudy Giuliani

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2016, file photo, then-President-elect Donald Trump, right, and former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani pose for photographs as Giuliani arrives at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Giuliani is joining the legal team defending President Donald Trump in the special counsel’s Russia investigation. That’s according to a statement from Trump personal attorney Jay Sekulow. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, an outspoken supporter of Donald Trump since the early days of his campaign, is joining the team of lawyers representing the president in the special counsel’s Russia investigation.

Woman who lost pink house, court case seeks box office win

FILE - In this June 21, 2008, file photo, Susette Kelo, left, former owner of the controversial little pink house, stands in front of her old home at its new location in New London, Conn. A Supreme Court case that involved a Connecticut woman and her little pink house is now a movie. Susette Kelo took on the city of New London, which was trying to take her house through eminent domain. She ultimately lost in a 5-4 decision by the Supreme Court. A movie based on her court fight, “Little Pink House,” opens Friday in limited nationwide release. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Susette Kelo’s Supreme Court case now has a Hollywood ending, just not the one she hoped for.

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