Printed on: November 26, 2013

NATIONAL news briefly


Football rape grand jury charges 4 more

STEUBENVILLE, Ohio (AP) -- An Ohio school superintendent and three others were charged Monday with lying or failing to report possible child abuse after an investigation prompted by the rape of a nearly passed-out 16-year-old girl by two high school football players.

The investigation included crimes committed in connection with the case against two members of the celebrated Steubenville High School football team as well as a separate alleged rape that happened in April 2012, four months before the assault that drew nationwide attention over allegations that prosecutors should have charged more players.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine convened the grand jury to look into the behavior of school administrators and other adults in the community after the two players were convicted in March. Under the law, educators are required to report allegations of child abuse.

Two people had already been charged before Steubenville Superintendent Mike McVey, strength coach Seth Fluharty, volunteer football coach Matthew Belardine and elementary school principal Lynnett Gorman were charged Monday.

Contractor charged with murder in Pa.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- A cut-rate building contractor will face murder charges for a botched demolition in downtown Philadelphia that killed six people inside an adjacent store.

Prosecutors called Griffin Campbell "the center of culpability" for the June collapse and said he ignored his client's warning the night before that disaster was imminent.

Campbell, 49, had a deadline to meet, was being paid a flat fee and wanted to preserve as much salvageable material as he could, leading him to cut corners, Williams said. He charged Campbell with six counts each of third-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter.

Study: U.S. spewing much more methane

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The United States is spewing 50 percent more methane -- a potent heat-trapping gas -- than the federal government estimates, a new comprehensive scientific study says. Much of it is coming from just three states: Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

That means methane may be a bigger global warming issue than thought, scientists say. Methane is 21 times more potent at trapping heat than carbon dioxide, the most abundant global warming gas, although it doesn't stay in the air as long.

Much of that extra methane seems to be coming from livestock, including manure, belches and flatulence, as well as leaks from refining and drilling for oil and gas, the study says.