Printed on: July 10, 2013

Faldo will be back at Muirfield

By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer

The toughest question for any world-class golfer is to pick his favorite course in the world. It turned out to be easy for Nick Faldo once he set some parameters.

The six-time major champion was filming a promotional spot for Glenmorangie earlier this year when he was asked to name his favorite course and why. Faldo found himself wanting a little bit of everything, from the towering pines of Augusta National to the links courses of the British Open to the coastline of Pebble Beach.

As he tried to figure out how to mix all that together, another element entered the equation -- memories.

Muirfield.

"Unsolicited, it clicked," Faldo said in a recent interview. "Memorability is important, isn't it? And then I suddenly I thought, 'Muirfield.' That green, the 18th hole, I won two Opens, which is pretty darn cool. That probably woke me up and I thought, 'This is really an important place to me.'"

It means enough that Faldo will play in the British Open next week for the 35th time. The opening round is on the day he turns 56.

He last competed at St. Andrews in 2010, missing the cut with an 81 when he was caught in the worst of the wind. He did not enter another tournament as a tuneup leading up to Muirfield. He is relying on memories, and as good as they are, they won't be enough for him to play like he once did.

No matter.

"It will be the last walk at Muirfield," Faldo said. "If I could just get in the right frame of mind, if I hit the golf ball solid, that's as good as it gets. If it goes sideways, if I can't put a score on the card, you're going to have to accept that."

Faldo rarely hit it sideways, certainly not at Muirfield.

It was in 1987 when Faldo famously made 18 pars in a gloomy final round and captured the first of his three Open titles when Paul Azinger faltered. Five years later, Faldo was a machine until he made a mess of the final round, losing a four-shot lead in five holes and then recovering with four of the best holes he ever played to beat John Cook, who helped by botching the last two holes.

Muirfield has the greatest collection of champions of any major course in the world. Faldo and James Braid are the only players to win the Open there twice.