Yellowstone Park continues to improve cell service

Visitors use smartphones to photograph Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in this Aug. 25, 2015, photo. Cellular phone service in Yellowstone National Park will see improvements this summer, the Bozeman (Mont.) Daily Chronicle reports. Jim Peaco / Yellowstone National Park

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) — Cellular phone service in Yellowstone National Park will see improvements this summer despite criticism from some that argue increased connectivity takes away from the serenity of the country’s first national park.

Prime time: A day of deals at Amazon, and at its rivals

In this Aug. 3, 2017, file photo, packages ride on a conveyor system at an Amazon fulfillment center in Baltimore. Amazon's Prime Day starts July 16, 2018, and will be six hours longer than last year's and will launch new products. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is extending its annual “Prime Day” promotion to 36 hours this year and will try to lure more deal-seekers to the aisles of Whole Foods. Shoppers will have plenty of sales to choose from as other retailers offer promotions to try to take a share of the spending.

Vanity awards target businesses

Everyone wants to be the best, especially business owners who believe they run their company better than their competition. It can be pretty flattering when these business owners receive phone calls, emails or letters telling them they’ve won an award for being the best, but not all kudos are legit. Better Business Bureau is reminding business owners to be wary of any notifications letting them know they can claim their trophy for a fee.

Fall River CEO meets with Interior Secretary Zinke

Courtesy of Fall River Rural Electric Cooperative Fall River Rural Electric Cooperative CEO Bryan Case, right, is pictured with U.S. Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke in Zinke’s Washington, D.C., office in late June. courtesy Fall River Rural Electric Cooperative

Fall River Rural Electric Cooperative’s CEO/General Manager Bryan Case met with U.S. Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke in late June in Washington, D.C.

How much all-seeing AI surveillance is too much?

In this April 23, 2018, photo, Ashley McManus, global marketing director of the Boston-based artificial intelligence firm, Affectiva, demonstrates facial recognition technology that is geared to help detect driver distraction, at their offices in Boston. Recent advances in AI-powered computer vision have spawned startups like Affectiva, accelerated the race for self-driving cars and powered the increasingly sophisticated photo-tagging features found on Facebook and Google. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

BOSTON — When a CIA-backed venture capital fund took an interest in Rana el Kaliouby’s face-scanning technology for detecting emotions, the computer scientist and her colleagues did some soul-searching — and then turned down the money.

How should businesses respond to bad reviews?

This photo shows an online review of a restaurant on a screen Thursday, July 5, 2018, in Portland Ore. A bad review can seriously hinder a small business’ reputation, but dealing with negative social media and online posts is now essential. “This is something you simply can’t ignore,” said Columbia Business School professor Jeremy Kagan. “The best defense is a good offense.” (AP Photo)

NEW YORK — A bad review can seriously hinder a small business’ reputation, but dealing with negative social media and online posts is now essential.

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