Jack Johnson descendant hopes for pardon, maybe from Trump

FILE - In this 1932 file photo, boxer Jack Johnson, the first black world heavyweight champion, poses in New York City. Black athletes have been finding a way to fight for social change for more than 100 years, from Jack Johnson, to Muhammad Ali to Kaepernick. (AP Photo/File)

In Jim Crow America, it’s no wonder that Jack Johnson was the most despised African-American of his generation.

Money spent on lobbying skyrocketed during tax overhaul

FILE - This Dec. 3, 2015, file photo shows an existing home for sale in Roswell, Ga. Money spent on lobbying by corporations, trade associations and special interest groups spiked during the final three months of 2017 as they battled for the biggest breaks possible in the most dramatic rewrite of the U.S. tax code in more than 30 years. The figures for the heavyweights are eye-popping. The National Association of Realtors tallied $22.2 million between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31, according to newly filed disclosure reports. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Money spent on lobbying by corporations, trade associations and special interest groups spiked during the final three months of 2017 as they battled for the biggest breaks possible in the most dramatic tax overhaul in more than 30 years.

AI in the court: When algorithms rule on jail time

In this Aug. 30, 2017, photo, Judge Jimmy Jackson Jr. speaks on the first day of the use of risk-assessment software in Municipal Court in Cleveland. His court is joining other courts across the country in use of artificial intelligence to help determine bond and parole for defendants. (AP Photo/Dake Kang)

CLEVELAND (AP) — The centuries-old process of releasing defendants on bail, long the province of judicial discretion, is getting a major assist … courtesy of artificial intelligence.

Amtrak bears the cost of accidents even if not at fault

The wreckage of an Amtrak train, bottom, and a CSX freight train lie next to the tracks in Cayce, SC., on Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018. The trains collided in the early morning darkness Sunday, killing the Amtrak conductor and engineer, and injuring more than 100 passengers. (AP Photo/Jeff Blake)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal investigators are still looking at how CSX railway crews routed an Amtrak train into a parked freight train in Cayce, South Carolina, last weekend. But even if CSX should bear sole responsibility for the accident, Amtrak will likely end up paying crash victims’ legal claims with public money.

Russian hackers hunt hi-tech secrets, exploit U.S. weakness

This combination of photos shows an Air Force F-22 Raptor stealth fighter jet, left, an MQ-9 Reaper/"Predator B" drone, right, and an X-37B unmanned spacecraft, bottom. Data supplied by the cybersecurity firm Secureworks shows Fancy Bear’s hacking targets included defense contractor employees at Lockheed Martin, General Atomics, and Boeing, involved in the development of these systems. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, Heather Ainsworth, U.S. Air Force via AP)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Russian cyberspies pursuing the secrets of military drones and other sensitive U.S. defense technology tricked key contract workers into exposing their email to theft, an Associated Press investigation has found.

Iconic photo showed America Vietnam War’s toll

FILE - This April 1968 file photo shows the first sergeant of A Company, 101st Airborne Division, guiding a medevac helicopter through the jungle foliage to pick up casualties suffered during a five-day patrol near Hue, April 1968. Two soldiers in the photo, Dallas Brown, bottom, and Tim Wintenburg, far right, recently reunited to talk to The Associated Press about the iconic photo and the war. (AP Photo/Art Greenspon, File)

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. (AP) — Dallas Brown can still see the bullets coming for him 50 years later, smacking into the dirt at his feet as north Vietnamese soldiers fired on his platoon during an ambush deep in the jungle.

Era of trillion-dollar budget deficits is making a comeback

In this Jan. 21, 2018, file photo, lights illuminate the U.S. Capitol on second day of the federal shutdown as lawmakers negotiate behind closed doors in Washington. The era of trillion-dollar budget deficits is about make a comeback _ and a brewing budget deal hastened the arrival. Lawmakers are inching closer to a two-year, budget-busting spending pact that would give whopping budget increases to both the Pentagon and domestic programs have been inching closer to an agreement, according to aides and members of Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The era of trillion-dollar budget deficits is about to make a comeback — and a brewing budget deal could mean their return comes just next year.

AP Exclusive: Despite denial, Pope got abuse victim’s letter

Catherine Bonnet, French child psychiatrist and a member of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, gestures as she speaks during an interview with the Associated Press at Charles de Gaulle airport outside Paris, France, Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018. Commission members and a church sex-abuse victim say Pope Francis received a letter from the victim in 2015 that graphically detailed his abuse and a cover-up by Chilean church authorities, contradicting the pope’s recent insistence that no victims had come forward. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis received a victim’s letter in 2015 that graphically detailed sexual abuse at the hands of a priest and a cover-up by Chilean church authorities, contradicting the pope’s recent insistence that no victims had come forward, the letter’s author and members of Francis’ own sex- abuse commission have told The Associated Press.

New report details misuse of antipsychotics in nursing homes

This Aug. 3, 2017 photo provided by Human Rights Watch shows Laurel Cline during a visit to her mother Lenora, who has Alzheimer's disease, in a nursing home in Whittier, Calif. Laurel says her mother, during stays at three different nursing homes in recent years, was sometimes left neglected for hours at a time in her wheelchair after being given antipsychotics. "Instead of seeing what's wrong with her, they just want to drug her up," said Cline. (Ed Kashi/Human Rights Watch via AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. nursing homes have significantly reduced the use of powerful antipsychotic drugs among their elderly residents, responding to pressure from many directions. Yet advocacy groups insist that overmedication remains a major problem, and want the pressure to intensify.

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