A few months ago, I saw a photo of an old barbed-wire fence with each wire held in place by duct tape. I’ve never resorted to duct tape, but I’ve used other unusual methods to patch a fence.

Fluid and electrolyte loss may lead to fatigue, muscle spasms and cramps, thumps (spasm of the diaphragm muscle, triggered by a decrease in calcium and potassium), dehydration, or heat stroke in horses that work hard in hot weather. Dehydration from sweating can interfere with the body’s abi…

High summer temperatures can present problems for working horses. Temperatures above 80 degrees increase the risk for heat stress or heat stroke if relative humidity gets above 50%, with no breeze. Under these conditions, a horse has difficulty cooling himself, since sweat does not evaporate…

There can be advantages to using several species (cattle, sheep, goats) to utilize certain pastures. In the past 30 years, there has been a lot of research on the use of sheep and goats to control noxious weeds and brush without chemicals. Bret Olson, department of range, Montana State Unive…

Horse blankets are most often used in winter, but sometimes lightweight “fly sheets” are used during the summer to protect horses from biting flies. Show horses are sometimes blanketed for turnout to keep them cleaner if their pen gets muddy. A sick horse may need to be blanketed during incl…

There are many options today when selecting syringes for vaccinating or medicating livestock — many more than were available 50 years ago. The dose guns, disposable syringes and pistol-grip, multidose syringes are standard tools we take for granted, but they are relatively new inventions.

There are many options today when selecting syringes for vaccinating or medicating livestock — many more than were available 50 years ago. The dose guns, disposable syringes and pistol-grip, multidose syringes are standard tools we take for granted, but they are relatively new inventions.

If livestock can be grazed on rangelands, wildfires are kept to a minimum and are not as devastating and don’t destroy as much habitat and soil life, according to Fred Provenza, professor emeritus at Utah State University.