Washington Nuclear Cleanup

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee walks past a sign asking visitors to complete a health screening as he steps outside to talk to reporters, Thursday, June 2, 2022, at a Dept. of Ecology office in Richland, Wash. On May 25, 2022, Inslee’s office said the Governor had tested positive for COVID-19. Inslee, who has recently criticized the slow pace of cleaning up the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state, was speaking ahead of a scheduled tour of the nuclear weapons production site and repeated his message that more federal money is needed to finish the job. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

RICHLAND, Wash.(AP) — Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who has recently criticized the slow pace of cleaning up the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, toured the former nuclear weapons production site on Thursday and said more federal money is needed to finish the job.

Hanford created more than two-thirds of the nation’s plutonium for nuclear weapons, including the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, at the end of World War II. Left behind was the most contaminated nuclear site in the nation.


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