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Winter is coming to Craters of the Moon and the dark lava rock now wears a mantle of white. The loop drive is closed to automobile travel but there are still many opportunities to explore the park.

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Spotting a mountain goat perched high on a cliff might thrill many of the millions of tourists who visit Grand Teton National Park every year, but park officials say it might be time for the agile, bearded animals to go.

As I drove back from deer hunting near Sand Creek Ponds in Fremont County last Friday after dark, a steady snowfall kept the windshield wipers busy. After several miles, I could see the flashing lights of a truck up ahead. I wondered if they had harvested an elk and would need help loading it.

If you have a fifth- or sixth-grader who loves to ski or snowboard or one who’d like to learn, you’ll want to take advantage of the free skiing program offered by the Idaho Ski Areas Association, a.k.a. Ski Idaho, according to a press release.

First things first, don’t forget the Avalanche Awareness Night event at 7 p.m. Monday at Taylorview Middle School.

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Idaho’s steelhead fishing season will end, at least temporarily, in three weeks.

Before you eat that first bite of pumpkin pie today, I need to tell you a secret. If the filling came from a can, especially one marked Libby’s, it isn’t pumpkin at all — at least not the jack-o-lantern type — despite its name. It’s called Dickinson Pumpkin, which belongs to the squash speci…

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BILLINGS, Mont. — The return of wolves and cougars to Yellowstone National Park is helping restore a landscape that had been altered in their absence and allowing streams to return to a more natural state, according to a new study.

If the retail chains are any indicator, Christmas is just around the corner. In fact, it has been “just around the corner” since well before Halloween.

As Montana grizzly bears have pushed beyond their usual mountain strongholds into the Bitterroot and Judith Basin areas, Washington state residents got a surprise visit this fall from a 476-pound grizzly west of the Pend Oreille River.

Although increased predation by grizzly bears, cougars and wolves along with drought have been blamed for the decline in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s elk populations, a recent study said scientists have overlooked the effect the disease brucellosis is having on elk reproduction.

The authors of the new book “Wild Migrations: Atlas of Wyoming’s Ungulates” will present their findings of a six-year collaborative study during a program in Jackson, Wyo., on Sunday.

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I was returning from Boise via Craters of the Moon National Monument one November afternoon several years ago. A few miles from Arco, I noticed three mule deer in the field alongside the road. It wasn’t an unusual scene and I barely glanced at them as I drew closer. But when I realized what …